Building resilience to disasters and climate change

In the Pacific and Timor-Leste, we’re helping communities to survive disasters, reduce their vulnerability and adapt to climate change.

Climate change and natural disasters in the Pacific and Timor-Leste

The Pacific and Timor-Leste is one of World Vision’s geographical areas of work. This includes Vanuatu, Solomon Islands, Papua New Guinea and Timor-Leste.

Vanuatu and Solomon Islands are among the world’s most disaster-prone countries, vulnerable to cyclones, earthquakes, landslides and other hazards. With low-lying islands and atolls, they are also at risk to climate change and rising sea levels.

Communities in Timor-Leste are also vulnerable to climate change. It’s predicted to increase rainfall extremes and unpredictability, which may increase erosion, landslides and flooding.

Across the region, these challenges endanger lives and livelihoods. Communities have limited capacity to respond to and prepare for disasters. They also rely heavily on natural resources for their livelihoods, but have limited capacity to adapt to a changing climate and environment. 

Disaster Risk Reduction in the Pacific

The Pacific and Timor-Leste region faces major environmental challenges.Vanuatu and Solomon Islands are among the world’s most disaster-prone countries, vulnerable to cyclones, earthquakes, landslides and other hazards. World Vision helps communities to prepare for potential disasters and mitigate their impact. Much of our disaster response and preparedness work in the Pacific and Timor-Leste is funded by the Australian Government Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade (DFAT) and its New Zealand counterpart, the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Trade.
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Our disaster risk reduction work

We help communities to prepare for potential disasters and mitigate their impact. We also combine disaster resilience projects with climate change adaption to help communities maintain their livelihoods amid changing conditions. 

Through programming in livelihoods, water and sanitation, and health and nutrition, we also support communities to build their resilience. When disasters occur, communities can limit the impact of disasters on their lives and recover more quickly.

Building resilience includes a range of approaches, from building stronger houses and creating sustainable water sources through to savings groups and livelihood diversification.

By supporting Pacific and Timor-Leste communities in disaster preparedness, response and resilience, we're ensuring they're better equipped to survive disasters, reduce their vulnerability and adapt to a rapidly changing climate.

Ultimately, this means communities are better able to overcome poverty. 

Top: We support Village Disaster Risk Committees, like this group in Solomon Islands, to develop their own action plans. Middle: In Vanuatu, a Yakel community member points out the DFAT-funded tarpaulin he received to restore shelter to his family’s hut after Cyclone Pam. Bottom: Through early warning awareness sessions, we help communities prepare for disasters.

Partnering with the Australian Government

Much of our disaster response and preparedness work in the Pacific and Timor-Leste is funded by the Australian Government Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade (DFAT) and its New Zealand counterpart, the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Trade (MFAT).

In June 2017, DFAT announced a new funding mechanism called the Australian Humanitarian Partnership (AHP). This is a strategic five-year partnership between DFAT and a select grouping of Australian and international non-government and government organisations. These include – but are not limited to – World Vision, CARE, Caritas, Oxfam, Plan International and Save the Children.

The AHP will replace the Humanitarian Partnership Agreement (HPA), which has been in effect since 2011.

The AHP enables rapid and coordinated responses to humanitarian crises – both within Australia’s immediate region and beyond. It has a specific focus on strengthening the capacity of local communities and organisations in the Pacific and Timor-Leste to prepare for and respond to crises. 

Top: In partnership with the Solomon Islands National Disaster Management Office, we’re equipping flood-prone communities with flood gauges so they get the warning they need to evacuate. Bottom: “Hippo rollers”, funded through our partnership with Thankyou Group, help communities in Tanna, Vanuatu easily and safely store large amounts of clean water.

 

 

 

Top: World Vision savings groups, like this DFAT-supported group in Solomon Islands, help communities build their resilience. Bottom: We support farmers, like Rui in Timor-Leste, to learn sustainable land management techniques so they can adapt to a changing climate.

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