Help children and families who are sheltering in Bangladesh

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The cost per beneficiary is calculated based on the current project budget for the emergency relief response, which includes estimated beneficiary numbers and also incorporates costs associated with the global coordination of the disaster relief activities. World Vision Australia has capped its overheads at 10 percent to cover its fundraising and administration activities to support this appeal. 

Funds raised for an emergency appeal are applied to the emergency response and for rehabilitation activities in the affected areas. Should the funds raised exceed the amount required to meet the emergency needs of the people in affected areas, or if there are changes in circumstances beyond World Vision's control that limit its ability to use all funds in the affected areas, World Vision will use the excess funds to help people in other emergency situations.

 

Myanmar/Bangladesh crisis – latest news

Monsoon downpours are unleashing further chaos for 1.3 million people living in Cox's Bazar, a town that is now home to the world's most densely populated refugee camp.

When violence broke out in the Rakhine State in Myanmar in August 2017, more than 700,000 Rohingya people fled for their lives into neighbouring Bangladesh.

They joined an additional 200,000 Rohingya refugees who had already been sheltering in the area for several years.  This sparked a refugee crisis in Bangladesh that was the fastest growing in the world.

Now, monsoon rains are bringing more disaster. Storms have triggered mudslides and flooding in Bangladesh, causing havoc and destruction in the refugee camp. Many Rohingya refugees are in danger of their makeshift homes collapsing altogether.

Children are especially at risk. With water flooding and becoming contaminated, children are susceptible to serious diseases that are already rampant in the refugee camps. They are also in danger of being swept away or getting separated from their families in torrential rains.

“In the camps yesterday, I saw children standing next to houses that are teetering on the edge of cliffs and sewage-filled flood waters washing out bridges,” said Jimmy Tuhaise, World Vision’s Emergency Response Director in Cox’s Bazar, Bangladesh.

World Vision staff are battling the elements to help affected families, even as rain and mud are making roads slippery and impassable for aid delivery trucks. Essential supplies, including tarpaulins, rope and hygiene kits, are being given out to help refugees shelter from the downpours.

Humanitarian needs are growing as monsoons hit more than 1.3 million people living in Bangladesh.

Your help is urgently needed to protect children as they try to survive as refugees, and provide emergency items such as:

  • shelter, including tarpaulins
  • health services
  • child friendly spaces
  • wells and toilets
  • kits for mothers with babies
  • help for children with malnutrition

453,000

children need educational support

816,203

refugees need shelter

118,000

children are malnourished and need treatment


This is the fastest growing refugee crisis in the world – and one of the biggest man-made disasters in the region for decades. Children and families fleeing violence are in desperate need. 

World Vision's response

We have been present in Bangladesh since 1970, and scaled up our programming last year to also provide relief to refugees near Cox’s Bazar. World Vision is working in nine of 25 camp districts near Cox’s Bazar. We are the leading agency for camp coordination for the Burma Para refugee camp. 

We are distributing nearly 10,000 shelter upgrade kits to help families keep safe from the rains.

Seventeen new wells have been installed, helping 10,000 people. We have also built 232 latrines and created 262 bathing spaces. Distribution of more than 9,000 hygiene kits have helped 49,910 people stay clean and healthy.

World Vision will continue to strengthen its already extensive operations in the Cox’s Bazar camps to help refugees, particularly in monsoon season.



Tim Costello visits the Myanmar-Bangladesh border

Recently, World Vision Australia Chief Advocate Tim Costello visited the refugee camp at Cox’s Bazar on the border of Bangladesh and Myanmar, where he was distressed by the conditions he found.

“I have been to lots of terrible refugee camps but this tops the list,” said Tim. “This felt like the gates of hell.”

Mr Costello said that the endless number of refugees fleeing from Rakhine State in Myanmar was creating impossible conditions for Bangladesh – a country that already suffers from the effects of overcrowding and poverty.

Along with critical food assistance and health services, Tim said that it’s vital to restore a sense of hope to the refugees trapped at the border. “These people are stateless, they are now homeless and they are hopeless,” he said. “We must provide immediate aid but also a longer sense of hope and purpose.”

I’ve met mothers who should be breastfeeding and cannot lactate, and they now have malnourished children. Many walk 10 days without food just to get here because their villages were burned.

Tim Costello, World Vision Australia Chief Advocate

World Vision Australia Chief Advocate Tim Costello visits the Myanmar-Bangladesh border

Tim Costello discusses the world’s fastest-growing refugee crisis.

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I would like to donate:

Sorry, something has gone wrong while processing. Please try again later.

The cost per beneficiary is calculated based on the current project budget for the emergency relief response, which includes estimated beneficiary numbers and also incorporates costs associated with the global coordination of the disaster relief activities. World Vision Australia has capped its overheads at 10 percent to cover its fundraising and administration activities to support this appeal. 

Funds raised for an emergency appeal are applied to the emergency response and for rehabilitation activities in the affected areas. Should the funds raised exceed the amount required to meet the emergency needs of the people in affected areas, or if there are changes in circumstances beyond World Vision's control that limit its ability to use all funds in the affected areas, World Vision will use the excess funds to help people in other emergency situations.

453,000

children need educational support

816,203

refugees need shelter

118,000

children are malnourished and need treatment

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