You can help fight child hunger in the face of COVID-19

You can help fight child hunger in the face of COVID-19

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Your donation can provide 18 times more value for children at risk of famine.

Acute hunger is a humanitarian crisis. With nearly 3.1 million children dying from malnutrition each year, your support can help provide food and emergency supplies to children at risk of starvation, conflict, natural disasters and the devastation of COVID-19.


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people

for one month

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See the difference supporters like you made possible in 2020

6,075,589

hungry children and families reached with food and emergency supplies.

105,167,607

metric tonnes of food distributed in 16 countries.

284,379

children received nutritious school meals.


Combating hunger and malnutrition



A child's world comes crashing down


COVID-19 has changed eight-year-old Bishal’s world. Last year, lockdown caused his father Rony to lose his job as a chauffeur, meaning the family lost their sole income source overnight. “Only Allah knows how we are managing our livelihood,” says Rony. “Being worried about debt, I cannot sleep at night.”

To try and earn money for food, Rony has been desperately seeking casual jobs as a painter’s assistant on construction sites. And his wife Sumi has been forced to work long hours in a garment factory, just to try and put food on the table each night.

When Bishal was attacked by a stray dog outside their home, the family had no money to take him to the hospital. So they had to borrow from neighbours, adding to their mounting debt.

Bishal’s family was recently selected to receive monthly cash grants from World Vision to help them cope with the devastating impact of the pandemic. This has helped them provide nutritious food for Bishal and ensure ongoing treatment for his injuries.

“If I did not get that money at the right time, I don’t know what I would have done,” says Sumi. “It gave me my son’s life back.”

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Adapting to the New Normal


Adapting to the New Normal



Baby Beto bounces back from malnutrition


Young Beto is thriving. However, only 6 months ago, he was suffering from acute malnutrition and was rushed to hospital by Octavio, a World Vision Community Health Worker. He had been assessing children for severe malnutrition. “One of the key methods of assessing a child’s nutritional status is to measure their mid-upper arm circumference, and Beto’s was just under 11 centimetres.

He was severely malnourished and unwell,” he said.

“When Beto was sick, he didn’t laugh, and he didn’t play. He even stopped taking my breast milk,” said mum Ndahambelela. Sadly, 5.6 percent of children living in Angola are acutely malnourished due in part to Angola’s worse drought in 38 years. However, thousands of children are now being treated with ready-to-use therapeutic food (MANA) donated by Food for Famine and administered by World Vision.

“The drought has had a devastating impact on children here,” said Isaias Ricardo, World Vision Angola’s Nutrition Supervisor. “This therapeutic food has made, and continues to make a huge difference. MANA saves lives.” And it saved baby Beto’s life.

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One-year-old Beto is a picture of good health


Beto was severely malnourished, but now is thriving


FAQs

Your donation dollars multiply in value when combined with contributions from the UN World Food Programme including food, training and infrastructure.
 
Our focus is on increasing our programming in areas where we already work and our costs per person have reduced, meaning we can provide 18 times more value with your donation.
The tax deduction you receive will depend on your personal circumstances. You can use our tax donation calculator to estimate the potential tax benefit based on your donation amount and income bracket.

The United Nations World Food Programme (UN WFP) is the largest humanitarian agency fighting hunger worldwide. For over 30 years, World Vision has partnered with the UN WFP in a shared commitment to fight global hunger. 
 
This partnership enables World Vision to utilise the significant supply and resource networks of the UN WFP. We contribute our expertise in long-term development to deliver food and emergency supplies as part of comprehensive food assistance programming - including livelihoods training, school nutrition programs and food for assets initiatives.

 

Should funds raised for this appeal exceed the amount required to fund World Vision's work in delivering food assistance and other essential supplies provided by the World Food Programme and other United Nations agencies, World Vision will use the excess funds in other work to help communities respond to the long-term effects of food insecurity.

^ Your donation dollars multiply in value when combined with contributions from the UN World Food Programme including food, training and infrastructure.


More powerful together

Your donation will be multiplied 18 times through our partnership with the Nobel Peace Prize winning UN World Food Programme to help support hungry children and families.

UN World Food Programme and World Vision

Fighting poverty with food and nutrition


A childhood lost due to food insecurity


The children of the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) are suffering. Their lives profoundly changed due to a deadly mix of conflict, poverty, food shortages and COVID-19. 

Life for the vulnerable is harsh. Children lack access to clean water, sanitation and hygiene and many are exposed to abuse such as child labour and neglect. Sadly, as families see their income drop, more children will be forced to work. Children like 12-year-old Marie*.

Marie found herself with limited choices, already vulnerable to hunger, early marriage and child labour, she could no longer attend school or play freely with her friends because of the pandemic. Like many families, Marie’s parents resorted to sending their daughter out to work at the local community market to help feed her hungry family, as they simply didn’t have enough to eat.  

"The money I earn from selling these chikwangues (traditional bread) is used to buy food for the family and to pay our rent … My need is to be supported in ways that help us meet our food needs, so that I no longer sell chikwangues," shared Marie.  

*Name changed to protect identity.

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Growing vegetables and building self-sufficiency


World Vision is helping to address a food rations crisis by empowering families in Bidibidi refugee camp, northwestern Uganda, to plant kitchen gardens.

"We have empowered and supported refugees to establish kitchen gardens which allows them to grow vegetables in small gardens in their backyard, to supplement the food ration that UN WFP gives them through World Vision,” says Comfort, a World Vision Deputy Food Assistance Manager.

For the refugees of South Sudan preparing a day’s meal is not an easy task. Due to the quality and scarcity of firewood preparing meals can take hours. And for mother’s like Charity it means starting the day at 6.30am to begin the four-hour prep to make breakfast.

Food is so much more than a meal for many families in the settlements. Food distribution points become social events as friends catch up and families and neighbours connect over a meal. Sadly, this dynamic is changing. Due to the onset of the pandemic, food rations reduced by 30 percent in April of 2020 and the UN WFP warns of a worsening situation as the funding situation continues to deteriorate. Thankfully, the home-grown vegetable gardens provide a sustainable source of nutrients, for now.

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